Wyoming HWY 22/Teton Pass between Victor, ID, and Wilson, WY, is CLOSED
Travelers from Idaho can reach Jackson via US 26 and US 89 through Snake River Canyon.
For more info: Contact a visitor service agent at (307) 733-3316 or call 511 for up-to-date road information.
Commuter Resources

Latest Information
Whitewater with Dave Hansen Courtesy of Dave Hansen Whitewater

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions About Jackson Hole & the Surrounding Areas

Q: WHERE AM I? JACKSON OR JACKSON HOLE?

A: Both. Jackson Hole is a valley about 80 miles long and 15 miles wide; Jackson is the major town within the valley. The hole begins six miles south of Yellowstone Park and tapers down to the width of the Snake River at Munger Mountain, south of Jackson. The town was named Jackson Hole in 1894 when the post office was established. Many other holes were named in the intermountain west during the 1800's but few were marked on the maps.

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Q: WHERE AND WHAT IS TETON VILLAGE?

A: Teton Village is another community in Jackson Hole. It is located approximately 12 miles northwest of Jackson. It is the home of the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. In addition to the ski resort, visitors to Teton Village may enjoy the specialty shops, restaurants, and motels & condominiums that are located here. Additionally, a tram ride to the top of Rendezvous Mountain and a gondola ride to mid-mountain and the Couloir Restaurant are also available for guests to enjoy.

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Q: HOW FAR IS IT TO THE AIRPORT?

A: The airport is 8 miles north of Jackson.

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Q: WHERE IS THE NEAREST HOSPITAL?

A: St. John's Medical Center, 625 East Broadway, (307) 733-3636

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Q: WHAT MUSEUMS ARE IN JACKSON?

A: The Jackson Hole Historical Museum and the National Museum of Wildlife Art, among over 30 art galleries around the town square.

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Q: WHERE ARE THE PUBLIC RESTROOMS?

A: The Home Ranch parking lot, located on the corner of Gill and North Cache.

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Q: WHERE CAN I PARK MY R.V. WHILE I'M DOWNTOWN?

A: The Home Ranch town parking lot at the corner of Gill and North Cache.

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Q. WHERE IS GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK? HOW DO I GET THERE?

A: Grand Teton Park begins about five miles north of Jackson on Highway 89. Entrance gates are at Moose Junction, 12 miles north or Moran Junction, about 30 miles north of Jackson.

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Q: HOW FAR IS YELLOWSTONE PARK FROM JACKSON? HOW FAR IS OLD FAITHFUL?

A: The south entrance of YNP is about 60 miles north on U.S. Hwy 89. Old Faithful is about 40 miles further, about 100 miles from Jackson and it erupts every 60-90 minutes.

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Q: WHERE CAN WE SEE WILDLIFE?

A: Bison can be seen on the Antelope Flats area 13 miles northeast of Jackson, as well as in other parts of Teton Park. During the summer, elk come out of the trees along the base of the Tetons after the sun goes behind the mountains. They stay out all night and return to the woods shortly after sunrise. Pronghorn may be seen along park roads at almost any hour but elk or moose are uncommonly seen mid-day. Look for moose near water along the Gros Ventre River northeast of town or between the Oxbow Bend (33 miles north) and the Jackson Lake Lodge or the Jackson Lake dam in morning and evening. Moose may also be seen from the Gondola or Tram at Teton Village, 12 miles northwest of Jackson. Don't count on seeing bear since they have much terrain to wander away from the road. First light is your best bear bet.

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Q: WHAT ARE THE DATES OF THE FUTURE FALL ARTS FESTIVAL?

A: Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival is held in September each year. Click here!

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Q: WHAT, WHERE, AND WHEN IS THE SHOOT OUT?

A: The Shoot Out is a free outdoor gun show presented by the Shoot Out Gang and the Jackson Hole Playhouse. It is held nightly (except Sundays) from Memorial Day though Labor Day at 6:00pm on Jackson's Historic Town Square.

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Q: WHAT IS GOING ON DURING 4th OF JULY?

A: Parade, pancakes, live music, western rodeo, fireworks, and more!

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Mountains

Fun Facts

  • The New York Philharmonic held the first summer residency in its 147-year history in Jackson Hole during the first two weeks of July 1989. America's oldest orchestra performed four concerts as a benefit for Jackson Hole's Grand Teton Music Festival.
     
  • The first person to ski down the 13,772-foot Grand Teton was local resident Bill Briggs in 1971. In April 2009 Briggs was inducted into the U.S. National Ski Hall of Fame.
     
  • The headwaters of the Snake River are located in Teton County.
     
  • John Wayne's first speaking part was in "The Big Trail," filmed in Jackson Hole in 1929. It also is reputed to be the first time he rode a horse!
     
  • Over 15 feature films have been made on location in Jackson Hole including: "Shane," "Spencer's Mountain," "Any Which Way You Can," "Rocky IV," and "Django Unchained."
     
  • Jackson Hole Mountain Resort has one of the lowest base elevations of any ski resort area in the Rocky Mountains, at just 6,311 feet. Most other ski resorts in Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico have base elevations between 6,900 and 9,500 feet.
     
  • Over 60 species of mammals, over 100 species of birds, and a half dozen game fish can be found in the Jackson Hole/Yellowstone area. Most notable are big game such as elk, moose, bison, deer, antelope, mountain lion, grizzly and black bears, gray wolf and coyote, rare birds such as the bald eagle, trumpeter swan, blue heron, osprey, and native game fish such as the Snake River cutthroat trout and mountain whitefish. You can take a wildlife tour to have biologists teach you about these special animals.
     
  • Mountain men used the word hole to describe valleys totally surrounded by mountains. You can meet mountain men at our Old West Days Festival in May!
     
  • Yellowstone National Park has approximately 10,000 active thermal features. Old Faithful erupts approximately every 77 minutes, or between 45 and 110 minutes.
     
  • The record of the first ascent of Grand Teton, the highest peak in Grand Teton National Park, has long been a subject of debate. In 1898, William Owen, Bishop Spalding, John Shive, and Frank Petersen claimed the first ascent to the summit. However, it appears that Nathaniel Langford and John Stevenson probably preceded the Owen party by climbing Grand Teton when the two men were members of the 1872 Hayden Expedition. Nathaniel Langford was the first superintendent of Yellowstone National Park. If you're interested in climbing or even hiking we have amazing opportunities and guides to lead you.